Shooting 8×10 again!

white-river-falls,-may-2017-2

White River Falls, Tight Valley, Oregon

I finally made it down to the viewpoint at White River Falls with an 8×10 camera in May.  My left knee was well enough to attempt the climb down with 70 pounds of camera gear.  There may be hope yet.

Why Use 8×10 Film in a Digital Age?

Cedar-Creek-Grist-Mill-8x1November 2009. It’s 2:00 AM. I’m on the Burnside Bridge in Portland, Oregon. I have my Deardorff set up to photograph the city and it’s picturesque waterfront. It’s cold. I’m alone very near a bad part of town. The occasional pedestrian trudges past. I hope none of them are gang bangers or thieves. One short and stout man, possibly in his late 20’s, strolls up, and stops. He looks like he’s in a gang. I’m a little scared. He looks me and my camera up and down, and asks, “Do they still make film for those?”

I was so relieved that he asked a question, instead of mugging me, that I didn’t give the sarcastic answer. I told him, “Yes.” I showed him a few film holders. Two more young men stopped to watch what I was doing. I went about my work, talking to them about the process of using an 8×10 view camera. They asked a few more questions that I don’t recall, then one asked, “Why?”

The answer was so simple: Because I’m driven to.

I’ve told this story to many people over the years. I was fascinated with photography at an early age, but I didn’t get my first real camera (a Minolta XG1 ) until I went to Germany in 1983 with the US Army. I had no idea what I was doing back then, and I didn’t get very many good pictures. Disappointed, I put the camera down for a decade until I moved to Oregon. Once here, I found the Columbia Gorge to be a wonderful subject. I set out to teach myself photography. I bought books and magazines, and learned about light and pro films.

A name began working its way into my consciousness: Ansel Adams. I looked into his photograph, “Clearing Winter Storm” and my world changed. I could make out the needles on the trees. The picture was so sharp and dramatic. I decided to learn how to do it the way that Adams did. I moved up to medium format, bought a Hasselblad, and learned how to shoot black and white. When I was ready, I bought my first large format camera: a Linhof Technica. The learning curve was fairly steep, yet I soon found its limitations to be too problematic. I wanted tilt and shift. I bought a Calumet 4×5 monorail camera, and started my collection of lenses.

The next step was 8×10. I bought a clunky, old Calumet C-1. It turned out to be impossible to carry very far into the bush, so, when a Deardorff became available, I snatched it up, and haven’t looked back. 8×10 is the ultimate in sharpness. It’s not just the final image that matters. For the artist, it’s also the process used to get it.

The Columbia Gorge, October 2012

Water Colors, Wahkeena Fallf, Columbia Goege, Oregon

Water Colors, Wahkeena Falls, Columbia Gorge, Oregon. Autumn 1999.

My favorite time in the Columbia Gorge is the fall.  The leaves turn there slightly before they do in Portland, and on the rare day when the rain lets up, I’m out there with one of my cameras.  This year, I will be heading out with my Deardorff 8×10, and some very large sheets of color film.  A friend from Salem will be accompanying, and with any luck we’ll get something good.